Who is clinton portis dating

As early as 2003, Portis’s agent, Rosenhaus, was allegedly warned by former NFL player, Barrett Green that Rubin had mismanaged his money.[41] One source has indicated that Rosenhaus and Rubin shared at least 26 clients.[42] In September of 2004, “a 9,000 complaint was filed against Rubin with FINRA by former NFL Linebacker Johnny Rutledge.[43] Rutledge alleged ‘several of his signatures on certain life insurance application documents [were] not his.’”[44] According to Broker Check, which is publicly available on the FINRA website, Rubin and his firm settled a claim for ,000 shortly after it was filed.[45] They did so without either admitting or denying the allegations.[46] An article written by Jason Cole and Rand Getlin entitled “Raucous Lifestyle Leads to Fall of Jeff Rubin, Former Financial Adviser to NFL Players” chronicles not only Rubin’s spending habits and lifestyle, but all the red flags and misdeeds that could lead to financial mismanagement.[47] As a result of the Alabama casino investment and other investments, Rubin was barred from the securities industry after 31 NFL players lost million and the casino went bankrupt.[48] The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, a self-regulatory body for Wall Street, indicated that Rubin of Lighthouse Point, Florida made unsuitable and risky investment recommendations to his clients.[49] Executive Vice President and Chief of Enforcement for FINRA Brad Bennet said “This case demonstrates how broker misconduct can target high-income, inexperienced, and vulnerable investors.”[50] He further stated that “Jeffrey Rubin took advantage of professional athletes who placed their trust in him.”[51] Five players, Portis, Terrell Owens, Mike Peterson, Roscoe Parrish, and Dwayne Starks, have filed a malpractice lawsuit seeking damages against the law firm of Greenberg Traurig and Attorney Pamela Linden (“Linden”), a partner in that law firm with respect to the Alabama casino project that is now in Chapter 11 Bankruptcy.[52] The lawsuit indicates that the players met Linden through their former financial advisory firm, Pro Sports Financial, which was owned by Rubin.[53] On November 9, 2011, Portis commenced his own lawsuit against Greenberg Traurig, P. and Linden in the Circuit Court of the Eleventh Judicial Circuit in and for Miami-Dade County, Florida.[54] A copy of the pleading alleging Negligence and Breach of Fiduciary Duty is here: https://turtletalk.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/Paragraph 41 of said pleading indicates that on or before Portis decided to invest funds in the project, Linden and Greenberg Traurig knew, but failed to disclose to Portis, the following material facts: The allegations of the Complaint also show the trap that attorneys can fall into if not vigilant about maintaining an office free of conflicts of interest.This imaginary line, which is highlighted on TV screens, extends to both edges of the field parallel to the yard lines.At the beginning of a play, or down, the offense is lined up on one side of this line and the defense is on the other.Clinton Portis' whereabouts are unknown , he was last seen in the Washington DC Area ..Clinton Portis (“Portis”) played his collegiate football for the University of Miami, where he was on the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) National Championship team of 2001 and earned All-Big East First Team Honors in 2001.[1] Portis was drafted by the Denver Broncos (“Broncos”) in 2002 in Round 2, Pick 51 and played for the Broncos during the 2002-2003 seasons.[2] During his first two seasons with the Broncos, Portis rushed for over 1,500 yards in each season, averaging 5.5 yards per carry, and was selected as the National Football League (NFL) Offensive Rookie of the Year (2002).[3] Just before the 2004 season, the Broncos traded Portis to the Washington Redskins (“Redskins”) in exchange for Pro-Bowl Cornerback Champ Bailey and a 2004 2 Round pick.[4] During the 2004 season, Portis rushed for 1,315 yards, averaging 3.8 rushing yards per carry.[5] Portis was Redskins’ starting running back for seven seasons where he averaged 81.2 yards per game, was a two time Pro-bowler, and was voted one of the 80 greatest Redskins’ players over his career.[6] He accumulated 9,923 rushing yards, averaged 4.4 yards per carry, compiled 75 rushing touchdowns, and had six 1000 yard rushing seasons.[7] It is estimated that during Portis’ nine season NFL career he earned ,101,000, having a banner year in 2004 of ,380,000:[8] Year Team Total Cash 2002 Broncos

As early as 2003, Portis’s agent, Rosenhaus, was allegedly warned by former NFL player, Barrett Green that Rubin had mismanaged his money.[41] One source has indicated that Rosenhaus and Rubin shared at least 26 clients.[42] In September of 2004, “a $119,000 complaint was filed against Rubin with FINRA by former NFL Linebacker Johnny Rutledge.[43] Rutledge alleged ‘several of his signatures on certain life insurance application documents [were] not his.’”[44] According to Broker Check, which is publicly available on the FINRA website, Rubin and his firm settled a claim for $40,000 shortly after it was filed.[45] They did so without either admitting or denying the allegations.[46] An article written by Jason Cole and Rand Getlin entitled “Raucous Lifestyle Leads to Fall of Jeff Rubin, Former Financial Adviser to NFL Players” chronicles not only Rubin’s spending habits and lifestyle, but all the red flags and misdeeds that could lead to financial mismanagement.[47] As a result of the Alabama casino investment and other investments, Rubin was barred from the securities industry after 31 NFL players lost $43 million and the casino went bankrupt.[48] The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, a self-regulatory body for Wall Street, indicated that Rubin of Lighthouse Point, Florida made unsuitable and risky investment recommendations to his clients.[49] Executive Vice President and Chief of Enforcement for FINRA Brad Bennet said “This case demonstrates how broker misconduct can target high-income, inexperienced, and vulnerable investors.”[50] He further stated that “Jeffrey Rubin took advantage of professional athletes who placed their trust in him.”[51] Five players, Portis, Terrell Owens, Mike Peterson, Roscoe Parrish, and Dwayne Starks, have filed a malpractice lawsuit seeking damages against the law firm of Greenberg Traurig and Attorney Pamela Linden (“Linden”), a partner in that law firm with respect to the Alabama casino project that is now in Chapter 11 Bankruptcy.[52] The lawsuit indicates that the players met Linden through their former financial advisory firm, Pro Sports Financial, which was owned by Rubin.[53] On November 9, 2011, Portis commenced his own lawsuit against Greenberg Traurig, P. and Linden in the Circuit Court of the Eleventh Judicial Circuit in and for Miami-Dade County, Florida.[54] A copy of the pleading alleging Negligence and Breach of Fiduciary Duty is here: https://turtletalk.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/Paragraph 41 of said pleading indicates that on or before Portis decided to invest funds in the project, Linden and Greenberg Traurig knew, but failed to disclose to Portis, the following material facts: The allegations of the Complaint also show the trap that attorneys can fall into if not vigilant about maintaining an office free of conflicts of interest.This imaginary line, which is highlighted on TV screens, extends to both edges of the field parallel to the yard lines.At the beginning of a play, or down, the offense is lined up on one side of this line and the defense is on the other.Clinton Portis' whereabouts are unknown , he was last seen in the Washington DC Area ..Clinton Portis (“Portis”) played his collegiate football for the University of Miami, where he was on the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) National Championship team of 2001 and earned All-Big East First Team Honors in 2001.[1] Portis was drafted by the Denver Broncos (“Broncos”) in 2002 in Round 2, Pick 51 and played for the Broncos during the 2002-2003 seasons.[2] During his first two seasons with the Broncos, Portis rushed for over 1,500 yards in each season, averaging 5.5 yards per carry, and was selected as the National Football League (NFL) Offensive Rookie of the Year (2002).[3] Just before the 2004 season, the Broncos traded Portis to the Washington Redskins (“Redskins”) in exchange for Pro-Bowl Cornerback Champ Bailey and a 2004 2 Round pick.[4] During the 2004 season, Portis rushed for 1,315 yards, averaging 3.8 rushing yards per carry.[5] Portis was Redskins’ starting running back for seven seasons where he averaged 81.2 yards per game, was a two time Pro-bowler, and was voted one of the 80 greatest Redskins’ players over his career.[6] He accumulated 9,923 rushing yards, averaged 4.4 yards per carry, compiled 75 rushing touchdowns, and had six 1000 yard rushing seasons.[7] It is estimated that during Portis’ nine season NFL career he earned $43,101,000, having a banner year in 2004 of $13,380,000:[8] Year Team Total Cash 2002 Broncos $1,515,000 2003 Broncos $300,000 2004 Redskins $13,380,000 2005 Redskins $455,000 2006 Redskins $3,585,000 2007 Redskins $4,500,000 2008 Redskins $10,430,500 2009 Redskins $1,245,000 2010 Redskins $7,690,500 Total 9 seasons $43,101,000[9] As previously indicated Portis was drafted by the Broncos and signed in July of 2002 to a four year $2.65 million contract.[10] He was traded to the Redskins in March of 2004 and it was announced that the deal that Portis reached with the Redskins would make him the highest paid running back in league history.[11] It was reported that the eight year deal was worth $50.5 million and included $17 million in combined signing and option bonuses, and was negotiated by agents Drew Rosenhaus (“Rosenhaus”) and Jason Rosenhaus.[12] Portis was released by the Redskins in February of 2011 and retired from professional football in August of 2012.[13] After retirement Portis admitted to have suffered at least ten concussions.[14] In 2013, Portis joined other former NFL players in a civil class action lawsuit against the NFL with regards to repeated concussions and other head injuries.[15] The financial woes post-retirement of professional football players are well documented.If, after or within four downs the offense succeeds in advancing the ball 10 yards or more from the line of scrimmage at the original first down, they are awarded a new first down at the point where their player was tackled or run out of bounds on that play.Successfully advancing the ball 10 yards or more is therefore called "getting the first down." Then the offense gets another four downs to again advance at least another 10 yards, and so on down the field.

||

As early as 2003, Portis’s agent, Rosenhaus, was allegedly warned by former NFL player, Barrett Green that Rubin had mismanaged his money.[41] One source has indicated that Rosenhaus and Rubin shared at least 26 clients.[42] In September of 2004, “a $119,000 complaint was filed against Rubin with FINRA by former NFL Linebacker Johnny Rutledge.[43] Rutledge alleged ‘several of his signatures on certain life insurance application documents [were] not his.’”[44] According to Broker Check, which is publicly available on the FINRA website, Rubin and his firm settled a claim for $40,000 shortly after it was filed.[45] They did so without either admitting or denying the allegations.[46] An article written by Jason Cole and Rand Getlin entitled “Raucous Lifestyle Leads to Fall of Jeff Rubin, Former Financial Adviser to NFL Players” chronicles not only Rubin’s spending habits and lifestyle, but all the red flags and misdeeds that could lead to financial mismanagement.[47] As a result of the Alabama casino investment and other investments, Rubin was barred from the securities industry after 31 NFL players lost $43 million and the casino went bankrupt.[48] The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, a self-regulatory body for Wall Street, indicated that Rubin of Lighthouse Point, Florida made unsuitable and risky investment recommendations to his clients.[49] Executive Vice President and Chief of Enforcement for FINRA Brad Bennet said “This case demonstrates how broker misconduct can target high-income, inexperienced, and vulnerable investors.”[50] He further stated that “Jeffrey Rubin took advantage of professional athletes who placed their trust in him.”[51] Five players, Portis, Terrell Owens, Mike Peterson, Roscoe Parrish, and Dwayne Starks, have filed a malpractice lawsuit seeking damages against the law firm of Greenberg Traurig and Attorney Pamela Linden (“Linden”), a partner in that law firm with respect to the Alabama casino project that is now in Chapter 11 Bankruptcy.[52] The lawsuit indicates that the players met Linden through their former financial advisory firm, Pro Sports Financial, which was owned by Rubin.[53] On November 9, 2011, Portis commenced his own lawsuit against Greenberg Traurig, P. and Linden in the Circuit Court of the Eleventh Judicial Circuit in and for Miami-Dade County, Florida.[54] A copy of the pleading alleging Negligence and Breach of Fiduciary Duty is here: https://turtletalk.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/

Paragraph 41 of said pleading indicates that on or before Portis decided to invest funds in the project, Linden and Greenberg Traurig knew, but failed to disclose to Portis, the following material facts: The allegations of the Complaint also show the trap that attorneys can fall into if not vigilant about maintaining an office free of conflicts of interest.

This imaginary line, which is highlighted on TV screens, extends to both edges of the field parallel to the yard lines.

At the beginning of a play, or down, the offense is lined up on one side of this line and the defense is on the other.

,515,000 2003 Broncos 0,000 2004 Redskins ,380,000 2005 Redskins 5,000 2006 Redskins ,585,000 2007 Redskins ,500,000 2008 Redskins ,430,500 2009 Redskins

As early as 2003, Portis’s agent, Rosenhaus, was allegedly warned by former NFL player, Barrett Green that Rubin had mismanaged his money.[41] One source has indicated that Rosenhaus and Rubin shared at least 26 clients.[42] In September of 2004, “a $119,000 complaint was filed against Rubin with FINRA by former NFL Linebacker Johnny Rutledge.[43] Rutledge alleged ‘several of his signatures on certain life insurance application documents [were] not his.’”[44] According to Broker Check, which is publicly available on the FINRA website, Rubin and his firm settled a claim for $40,000 shortly after it was filed.[45] They did so without either admitting or denying the allegations.[46] An article written by Jason Cole and Rand Getlin entitled “Raucous Lifestyle Leads to Fall of Jeff Rubin, Former Financial Adviser to NFL Players” chronicles not only Rubin’s spending habits and lifestyle, but all the red flags and misdeeds that could lead to financial mismanagement.[47] As a result of the Alabama casino investment and other investments, Rubin was barred from the securities industry after 31 NFL players lost $43 million and the casino went bankrupt.[48] The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, a self-regulatory body for Wall Street, indicated that Rubin of Lighthouse Point, Florida made unsuitable and risky investment recommendations to his clients.[49] Executive Vice President and Chief of Enforcement for FINRA Brad Bennet said “This case demonstrates how broker misconduct can target high-income, inexperienced, and vulnerable investors.”[50] He further stated that “Jeffrey Rubin took advantage of professional athletes who placed their trust in him.”[51] Five players, Portis, Terrell Owens, Mike Peterson, Roscoe Parrish, and Dwayne Starks, have filed a malpractice lawsuit seeking damages against the law firm of Greenberg Traurig and Attorney Pamela Linden (“Linden”), a partner in that law firm with respect to the Alabama casino project that is now in Chapter 11 Bankruptcy.[52] The lawsuit indicates that the players met Linden through their former financial advisory firm, Pro Sports Financial, which was owned by Rubin.[53] On November 9, 2011, Portis commenced his own lawsuit against Greenberg Traurig, P. and Linden in the Circuit Court of the Eleventh Judicial Circuit in and for Miami-Dade County, Florida.[54] A copy of the pleading alleging Negligence and Breach of Fiduciary Duty is here: https://turtletalk.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/Paragraph 41 of said pleading indicates that on or before Portis decided to invest funds in the project, Linden and Greenberg Traurig knew, but failed to disclose to Portis, the following material facts: The allegations of the Complaint also show the trap that attorneys can fall into if not vigilant about maintaining an office free of conflicts of interest.This imaginary line, which is highlighted on TV screens, extends to both edges of the field parallel to the yard lines.At the beginning of a play, or down, the offense is lined up on one side of this line and the defense is on the other.Clinton Portis' whereabouts are unknown , he was last seen in the Washington DC Area ..Clinton Portis (“Portis”) played his collegiate football for the University of Miami, where he was on the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) National Championship team of 2001 and earned All-Big East First Team Honors in 2001.[1] Portis was drafted by the Denver Broncos (“Broncos”) in 2002 in Round 2, Pick 51 and played for the Broncos during the 2002-2003 seasons.[2] During his first two seasons with the Broncos, Portis rushed for over 1,500 yards in each season, averaging 5.5 yards per carry, and was selected as the National Football League (NFL) Offensive Rookie of the Year (2002).[3] Just before the 2004 season, the Broncos traded Portis to the Washington Redskins (“Redskins”) in exchange for Pro-Bowl Cornerback Champ Bailey and a 2004 2 Round pick.[4] During the 2004 season, Portis rushed for 1,315 yards, averaging 3.8 rushing yards per carry.[5] Portis was Redskins’ starting running back for seven seasons where he averaged 81.2 yards per game, was a two time Pro-bowler, and was voted one of the 80 greatest Redskins’ players over his career.[6] He accumulated 9,923 rushing yards, averaged 4.4 yards per carry, compiled 75 rushing touchdowns, and had six 1000 yard rushing seasons.[7] It is estimated that during Portis’ nine season NFL career he earned $43,101,000, having a banner year in 2004 of $13,380,000:[8] Year Team Total Cash 2002 Broncos $1,515,000 2003 Broncos $300,000 2004 Redskins $13,380,000 2005 Redskins $455,000 2006 Redskins $3,585,000 2007 Redskins $4,500,000 2008 Redskins $10,430,500 2009 Redskins $1,245,000 2010 Redskins $7,690,500 Total 9 seasons $43,101,000[9] As previously indicated Portis was drafted by the Broncos and signed in July of 2002 to a four year $2.65 million contract.[10] He was traded to the Redskins in March of 2004 and it was announced that the deal that Portis reached with the Redskins would make him the highest paid running back in league history.[11] It was reported that the eight year deal was worth $50.5 million and included $17 million in combined signing and option bonuses, and was negotiated by agents Drew Rosenhaus (“Rosenhaus”) and Jason Rosenhaus.[12] Portis was released by the Redskins in February of 2011 and retired from professional football in August of 2012.[13] After retirement Portis admitted to have suffered at least ten concussions.[14] In 2013, Portis joined other former NFL players in a civil class action lawsuit against the NFL with regards to repeated concussions and other head injuries.[15] The financial woes post-retirement of professional football players are well documented.If, after or within four downs the offense succeeds in advancing the ball 10 yards or more from the line of scrimmage at the original first down, they are awarded a new first down at the point where their player was tackled or run out of bounds on that play.Successfully advancing the ball 10 yards or more is therefore called "getting the first down." Then the offense gets another four downs to again advance at least another 10 yards, and so on down the field.

||

As early as 2003, Portis’s agent, Rosenhaus, was allegedly warned by former NFL player, Barrett Green that Rubin had mismanaged his money.[41] One source has indicated that Rosenhaus and Rubin shared at least 26 clients.[42] In September of 2004, “a $119,000 complaint was filed against Rubin with FINRA by former NFL Linebacker Johnny Rutledge.[43] Rutledge alleged ‘several of his signatures on certain life insurance application documents [were] not his.’”[44] According to Broker Check, which is publicly available on the FINRA website, Rubin and his firm settled a claim for $40,000 shortly after it was filed.[45] They did so without either admitting or denying the allegations.[46] An article written by Jason Cole and Rand Getlin entitled “Raucous Lifestyle Leads to Fall of Jeff Rubin, Former Financial Adviser to NFL Players” chronicles not only Rubin’s spending habits and lifestyle, but all the red flags and misdeeds that could lead to financial mismanagement.[47] As a result of the Alabama casino investment and other investments, Rubin was barred from the securities industry after 31 NFL players lost $43 million and the casino went bankrupt.[48] The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, a self-regulatory body for Wall Street, indicated that Rubin of Lighthouse Point, Florida made unsuitable and risky investment recommendations to his clients.[49] Executive Vice President and Chief of Enforcement for FINRA Brad Bennet said “This case demonstrates how broker misconduct can target high-income, inexperienced, and vulnerable investors.”[50] He further stated that “Jeffrey Rubin took advantage of professional athletes who placed their trust in him.”[51] Five players, Portis, Terrell Owens, Mike Peterson, Roscoe Parrish, and Dwayne Starks, have filed a malpractice lawsuit seeking damages against the law firm of Greenberg Traurig and Attorney Pamela Linden (“Linden”), a partner in that law firm with respect to the Alabama casino project that is now in Chapter 11 Bankruptcy.[52] The lawsuit indicates that the players met Linden through their former financial advisory firm, Pro Sports Financial, which was owned by Rubin.[53] On November 9, 2011, Portis commenced his own lawsuit against Greenberg Traurig, P. and Linden in the Circuit Court of the Eleventh Judicial Circuit in and for Miami-Dade County, Florida.[54] A copy of the pleading alleging Negligence and Breach of Fiduciary Duty is here: https://turtletalk.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/

Paragraph 41 of said pleading indicates that on or before Portis decided to invest funds in the project, Linden and Greenberg Traurig knew, but failed to disclose to Portis, the following material facts: The allegations of the Complaint also show the trap that attorneys can fall into if not vigilant about maintaining an office free of conflicts of interest.

This imaginary line, which is highlighted on TV screens, extends to both edges of the field parallel to the yard lines.

At the beginning of a play, or down, the offense is lined up on one side of this line and the defense is on the other.

,245,000 2010 Redskins ,690,500 Total 9 seasons ,101,000[9] As previously indicated Portis was drafted by the Broncos and signed in July of 2002 to a four year .65 million contract.[10] He was traded to the Redskins in March of 2004 and it was announced that the deal that Portis reached with the Redskins would make him the highest paid running back in league history.[11] It was reported that the eight year deal was worth .5 million and included million in combined signing and option bonuses, and was negotiated by agents Drew Rosenhaus (“Rosenhaus”) and Jason Rosenhaus.[12] Portis was released by the Redskins in February of 2011 and retired from professional football in August of 2012.[13] After retirement Portis admitted to have suffered at least ten concussions.[14] In 2013, Portis joined other former NFL players in a civil class action lawsuit against the NFL with regards to repeated concussions and other head injuries.[15] The financial woes post-retirement of professional football players are well documented.If, after or within four downs the offense succeeds in advancing the ball 10 yards or more from the line of scrimmage at the original first down, they are awarded a new first down at the point where their player was tackled or run out of bounds on that play.Successfully advancing the ball 10 yards or more is therefore called "getting the first down." Then the offense gets another four downs to again advance at least another 10 yards, and so on down the field.

[19] According to the filing, Portis lists approximately .29 million in total assets, “but million of that should have an asterisk” next to it .[20] “[Portis] lists claims against Pro Sports Financial ( million) — an outfit he sued in federal court over a failed casino venture – and a million claim against Jade Private Wealth Management.”[21] Jade Private Wealth Management is a now out-of-business Virginia firm.[22] Jade’s former owner, Jinesh “Hodge” Brahmbhatt, had previously been banned as a financial advisor by the NFLPA after scamming several professional athletes, including Portis, out of millions of dollars by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority[23] which termed the transactions as a “Ponzi Scheme.”[24] In my editorial in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel dated October 17, 2012 entitled “Woodson, A Financial All-Star,” I listed reasons why athletes lose their fortunes and face financial stress and bankruptcy based on past research, including: 1) spending like a drunken sailor as if the checks will never stop; 2) creating unsustainable lifestyles; 3) buying houses the size of Texas; 4) diamonds and automobiles seem to be the favorite consumables; 5) risky and sometimes even inane ‘investments,’ such as inflatable furniture rafts, sonic rays, music labels, nightclubs, T-shirt companies, cosmetic procedures and Ponzi schemes; 6) a chronic misallocation of investment dollars into nonliquid assets and private equity deals; 7) misplaced trust and agent mismanagement; 8) granting powers of attorney; 9) divorce and paternity actions; and 10) supporting enablers.”[25] Portis is a story of youth, enormous wealth, and misplaced trust. attempted to repay the remainder with six checks that were all refused by the bank because Portis had insufficient funds.”[30] The casino has filed an adversary proceeding in his bankruptcy case requesting non-dischargeability.[31] The United States Trustee has filed a Motion to Dismiss Portis’ bankruptcy “citing the fact that Portis has failed to submit financial reports and tax documents” as required, and “has not paid his mandated court fees.”[32] The dismissal was scheduled to be heard on March 3, 2016.[33] At the center of any athlete’s bankruptcy is a bad investment and a questionable financial advisor.

The money that was supposed to have supported these guys for the rest of their lives has been taken from them and many have been left with nothing.

This is truly a tragic story.[71] The alleged losses asserted in the lawsuit against BB&T include: Jevon Kearse – ,958,000 Jamaal Anderson – ,813,000 Lito Sheppard – ,011,000 Santana Moss – ,852,000 Ray Lewis – ,778,000 Brandon Meriweather – ,545,000 Jacob Bell – ,339,000 Clinton Portis – ,136,000 Gerard Warren – ,000,000 Fred Taylor – ,993,000 Derrick Gaffney – ,295,000 Greg Jones – ,006,000 Kenard Lang –

[19] According to the filing, Portis lists approximately $13.29 million in total assets, “but $10 million of that should have an asterisk” next to it .[20] “[Portis] lists claims against Pro Sports Financial ($8 million) — an outfit he sued in federal court over a failed casino venture – and a $2 million claim against Jade Private Wealth Management.”[21] Jade Private Wealth Management is a now out-of-business Virginia firm.[22] Jade’s former owner, Jinesh “Hodge” Brahmbhatt, had previously been banned as a financial advisor by the NFLPA after scamming several professional athletes, including Portis, out of millions of dollars by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority[23] which termed the transactions as a “Ponzi Scheme.”[24] In my editorial in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel dated October 17, 2012 entitled “Woodson, A Financial All-Star,” I listed reasons why athletes lose their fortunes and face financial stress and bankruptcy based on past research, including: 1) spending like a drunken sailor as if the checks will never stop; 2) creating unsustainable lifestyles; 3) buying houses the size of Texas; 4) diamonds and automobiles seem to be the favorite consumables; 5) risky and sometimes even inane ‘investments,’ such as inflatable furniture rafts, sonic rays, music labels, nightclubs, T-shirt companies, cosmetic procedures and Ponzi schemes; 6) a chronic misallocation of investment dollars into nonliquid assets and private equity deals; 7) misplaced trust and agent mismanagement; 8) granting powers of attorney; 9) divorce and paternity actions; and 10) supporting enablers.”[25] Portis is a story of youth, enormous wealth, and misplaced trust. attempted to repay the remainder with six checks that were all refused by the bank because Portis had insufficient funds.”[30] The casino has filed an adversary proceeding in his bankruptcy case requesting non-dischargeability.[31] The United States Trustee has filed a Motion to Dismiss Portis’ bankruptcy “citing the fact that Portis has failed to submit financial reports and tax documents” as required, and “has not paid his mandated court fees.”[32] The dismissal was scheduled to be heard on March 3, 2016.[33] At the center of any athlete’s bankruptcy is a bad investment and a questionable financial advisor.

The money that was supposed to have supported these guys for the rest of their lives has been taken from them and many have been left with nothing.

This is truly a tragic story.[71] The alleged losses asserted in the lawsuit against BB&T include: Jevon Kearse – $7,958,000 Jamaal Anderson – $5,813,000 Lito Sheppard – $5,011,000 Santana Moss – $4,852,000 Ray Lewis – $3,778,000 Brandon Meriweather – $3,545,000 Jacob Bell – $3,339,000 Clinton Portis – $3,136,000 Gerard Warren – $3,000,000 Fred Taylor – $2,993,000 Derrick Gaffney – $2,295,000 Greg Jones – $2,006,000 Kenard Lang – $1,648,000 Frank Gore – $1,600,000 Santonio Holmes – $1,159,000 Tavares Gooden – $515,000.[72] After beginning a jury trial in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, U. District Court Judge Beth Bloom accepted a settlement agreement between the parties for an undisclosed amount and dismissed the lawsuit with prejudice.[73] BB&T’s statement said, “Both parties are pleased to resolve this matter.”[74] “We have decided to keep the terms of our settlement confidential and cannot comment further.”[75] Plaintiff’s Attorney Andrew Kagan also said, “All I am at liberty to say is that both sides are pleased with the resolution.”[76] Portis is just one of many athletes that has seen a career of riches result in financial disaster.

If on the kickoff the ball lands out of bounds into the receiving team's end zone and no one tries to run with it, play begins at the receiving team's 20 yard line.

The receiving team, called the offense, now has four tries, called downs, to advance the ball at least 10 yards down the field.

||

[19] According to the filing, Portis lists approximately $13.29 million in total assets, “but $10 million of that should have an asterisk” next to it .[20] “[Portis] lists claims against Pro Sports Financial ($8 million) — an outfit he sued in federal court over a failed casino venture – and a $2 million claim against Jade Private Wealth Management.”[21] Jade Private Wealth Management is a now out-of-business Virginia firm.[22] Jade’s former owner, Jinesh “Hodge” Brahmbhatt, had previously been banned as a financial advisor by the NFLPA after scamming several professional athletes, including Portis, out of millions of dollars by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority[23] which termed the transactions as a “Ponzi Scheme.”[24] In my editorial in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel dated October 17, 2012 entitled “Woodson, A Financial All-Star,” I listed reasons why athletes lose their fortunes and face financial stress and bankruptcy based on past research, including: 1) spending like a drunken sailor as if the checks will never stop; 2) creating unsustainable lifestyles; 3) buying houses the size of Texas; 4) diamonds and automobiles seem to be the favorite consumables; 5) risky and sometimes even inane ‘investments,’ such as inflatable furniture rafts, sonic rays, music labels, nightclubs, T-shirt companies, cosmetic procedures and Ponzi schemes; 6) a chronic misallocation of investment dollars into nonliquid assets and private equity deals; 7) misplaced trust and agent mismanagement; 8) granting powers of attorney; 9) divorce and paternity actions; and 10) supporting enablers.”[25] Portis is a story of youth, enormous wealth, and misplaced trust. attempted to repay the remainder with six checks that were all refused by the bank because Portis had insufficient funds.”[30] The casino has filed an adversary proceeding in his bankruptcy case requesting non-dischargeability.[31] The United States Trustee has filed a Motion to Dismiss Portis’ bankruptcy “citing the fact that Portis has failed to submit financial reports and tax documents” as required, and “has not paid his mandated court fees.”[32] The dismissal was scheduled to be heard on March 3, 2016.[33] At the center of any athlete’s bankruptcy is a bad investment and a questionable financial advisor.The money that was supposed to have supported these guys for the rest of their lives has been taken from them and many have been left with nothing.This is truly a tragic story.[71] The alleged losses asserted in the lawsuit against BB&T include: Jevon Kearse – $7,958,000 Jamaal Anderson – $5,813,000 Lito Sheppard – $5,011,000 Santana Moss – $4,852,000 Ray Lewis – $3,778,000 Brandon Meriweather – $3,545,000 Jacob Bell – $3,339,000 Clinton Portis – $3,136,000 Gerard Warren – $3,000,000 Fred Taylor – $2,993,000 Derrick Gaffney – $2,295,000 Greg Jones – $2,006,000 Kenard Lang – $1,648,000 Frank Gore – $1,600,000 Santonio Holmes – $1,159,000 Tavares Gooden – $515,000.[72] After beginning a jury trial in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, U. District Court Judge Beth Bloom accepted a settlement agreement between the parties for an undisclosed amount and dismissed the lawsuit with prejudice.[73] BB&T’s statement said, “Both parties are pleased to resolve this matter.”[74] “We have decided to keep the terms of our settlement confidential and cannot comment further.”[75] Plaintiff’s Attorney Andrew Kagan also said, “All I am at liberty to say is that both sides are pleased with the resolution.”[76] Portis is just one of many athletes that has seen a career of riches result in financial disaster.If on the kickoff the ball lands out of bounds into the receiving team's end zone and no one tries to run with it, play begins at the receiving team's 20 yard line.The receiving team, called the offense, now has four tries, called downs, to advance the ball at least 10 yards down the field.

,648,000 Frank Gore –

[19] According to the filing, Portis lists approximately $13.29 million in total assets, “but $10 million of that should have an asterisk” next to it .[20] “[Portis] lists claims against Pro Sports Financial ($8 million) — an outfit he sued in federal court over a failed casino venture – and a $2 million claim against Jade Private Wealth Management.”[21] Jade Private Wealth Management is a now out-of-business Virginia firm.[22] Jade’s former owner, Jinesh “Hodge” Brahmbhatt, had previously been banned as a financial advisor by the NFLPA after scamming several professional athletes, including Portis, out of millions of dollars by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority[23] which termed the transactions as a “Ponzi Scheme.”[24] In my editorial in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel dated October 17, 2012 entitled “Woodson, A Financial All-Star,” I listed reasons why athletes lose their fortunes and face financial stress and bankruptcy based on past research, including: 1) spending like a drunken sailor as if the checks will never stop; 2) creating unsustainable lifestyles; 3) buying houses the size of Texas; 4) diamonds and automobiles seem to be the favorite consumables; 5) risky and sometimes even inane ‘investments,’ such as inflatable furniture rafts, sonic rays, music labels, nightclubs, T-shirt companies, cosmetic procedures and Ponzi schemes; 6) a chronic misallocation of investment dollars into nonliquid assets and private equity deals; 7) misplaced trust and agent mismanagement; 8) granting powers of attorney; 9) divorce and paternity actions; and 10) supporting enablers.”[25] Portis is a story of youth, enormous wealth, and misplaced trust. attempted to repay the remainder with six checks that were all refused by the bank because Portis had insufficient funds.”[30] The casino has filed an adversary proceeding in his bankruptcy case requesting non-dischargeability.[31] The United States Trustee has filed a Motion to Dismiss Portis’ bankruptcy “citing the fact that Portis has failed to submit financial reports and tax documents” as required, and “has not paid his mandated court fees.”[32] The dismissal was scheduled to be heard on March 3, 2016.[33] At the center of any athlete’s bankruptcy is a bad investment and a questionable financial advisor.

The money that was supposed to have supported these guys for the rest of their lives has been taken from them and many have been left with nothing.

This is truly a tragic story.[71] The alleged losses asserted in the lawsuit against BB&T include: Jevon Kearse – $7,958,000 Jamaal Anderson – $5,813,000 Lito Sheppard – $5,011,000 Santana Moss – $4,852,000 Ray Lewis – $3,778,000 Brandon Meriweather – $3,545,000 Jacob Bell – $3,339,000 Clinton Portis – $3,136,000 Gerard Warren – $3,000,000 Fred Taylor – $2,993,000 Derrick Gaffney – $2,295,000 Greg Jones – $2,006,000 Kenard Lang – $1,648,000 Frank Gore – $1,600,000 Santonio Holmes – $1,159,000 Tavares Gooden – $515,000.[72] After beginning a jury trial in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, U. District Court Judge Beth Bloom accepted a settlement agreement between the parties for an undisclosed amount and dismissed the lawsuit with prejudice.[73] BB&T’s statement said, “Both parties are pleased to resolve this matter.”[74] “We have decided to keep the terms of our settlement confidential and cannot comment further.”[75] Plaintiff’s Attorney Andrew Kagan also said, “All I am at liberty to say is that both sides are pleased with the resolution.”[76] Portis is just one of many athletes that has seen a career of riches result in financial disaster.

If on the kickoff the ball lands out of bounds into the receiving team's end zone and no one tries to run with it, play begins at the receiving team's 20 yard line.

The receiving team, called the offense, now has four tries, called downs, to advance the ball at least 10 yards down the field.

||

[19] According to the filing, Portis lists approximately $13.29 million in total assets, “but $10 million of that should have an asterisk” next to it .[20] “[Portis] lists claims against Pro Sports Financial ($8 million) — an outfit he sued in federal court over a failed casino venture – and a $2 million claim against Jade Private Wealth Management.”[21] Jade Private Wealth Management is a now out-of-business Virginia firm.[22] Jade’s former owner, Jinesh “Hodge” Brahmbhatt, had previously been banned as a financial advisor by the NFLPA after scamming several professional athletes, including Portis, out of millions of dollars by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority[23] which termed the transactions as a “Ponzi Scheme.”[24] In my editorial in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel dated October 17, 2012 entitled “Woodson, A Financial All-Star,” I listed reasons why athletes lose their fortunes and face financial stress and bankruptcy based on past research, including: 1) spending like a drunken sailor as if the checks will never stop; 2) creating unsustainable lifestyles; 3) buying houses the size of Texas; 4) diamonds and automobiles seem to be the favorite consumables; 5) risky and sometimes even inane ‘investments,’ such as inflatable furniture rafts, sonic rays, music labels, nightclubs, T-shirt companies, cosmetic procedures and Ponzi schemes; 6) a chronic misallocation of investment dollars into nonliquid assets and private equity deals; 7) misplaced trust and agent mismanagement; 8) granting powers of attorney; 9) divorce and paternity actions; and 10) supporting enablers.”[25] Portis is a story of youth, enormous wealth, and misplaced trust. attempted to repay the remainder with six checks that were all refused by the bank because Portis had insufficient funds.”[30] The casino has filed an adversary proceeding in his bankruptcy case requesting non-dischargeability.[31] The United States Trustee has filed a Motion to Dismiss Portis’ bankruptcy “citing the fact that Portis has failed to submit financial reports and tax documents” as required, and “has not paid his mandated court fees.”[32] The dismissal was scheduled to be heard on March 3, 2016.[33] At the center of any athlete’s bankruptcy is a bad investment and a questionable financial advisor.The money that was supposed to have supported these guys for the rest of their lives has been taken from them and many have been left with nothing.This is truly a tragic story.[71] The alleged losses asserted in the lawsuit against BB&T include: Jevon Kearse – $7,958,000 Jamaal Anderson – $5,813,000 Lito Sheppard – $5,011,000 Santana Moss – $4,852,000 Ray Lewis – $3,778,000 Brandon Meriweather – $3,545,000 Jacob Bell – $3,339,000 Clinton Portis – $3,136,000 Gerard Warren – $3,000,000 Fred Taylor – $2,993,000 Derrick Gaffney – $2,295,000 Greg Jones – $2,006,000 Kenard Lang – $1,648,000 Frank Gore – $1,600,000 Santonio Holmes – $1,159,000 Tavares Gooden – $515,000.[72] After beginning a jury trial in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, U. District Court Judge Beth Bloom accepted a settlement agreement between the parties for an undisclosed amount and dismissed the lawsuit with prejudice.[73] BB&T’s statement said, “Both parties are pleased to resolve this matter.”[74] “We have decided to keep the terms of our settlement confidential and cannot comment further.”[75] Plaintiff’s Attorney Andrew Kagan also said, “All I am at liberty to say is that both sides are pleased with the resolution.”[76] Portis is just one of many athletes that has seen a career of riches result in financial disaster.If on the kickoff the ball lands out of bounds into the receiving team's end zone and no one tries to run with it, play begins at the receiving team's 20 yard line.The receiving team, called the offense, now has four tries, called downs, to advance the ball at least 10 yards down the field.

,600,000 Santonio Holmes –

[19] According to the filing, Portis lists approximately $13.29 million in total assets, “but $10 million of that should have an asterisk” next to it .[20] “[Portis] lists claims against Pro Sports Financial ($8 million) — an outfit he sued in federal court over a failed casino venture – and a $2 million claim against Jade Private Wealth Management.”[21] Jade Private Wealth Management is a now out-of-business Virginia firm.[22] Jade’s former owner, Jinesh “Hodge” Brahmbhatt, had previously been banned as a financial advisor by the NFLPA after scamming several professional athletes, including Portis, out of millions of dollars by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority[23] which termed the transactions as a “Ponzi Scheme.”[24] In my editorial in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel dated October 17, 2012 entitled “Woodson, A Financial All-Star,” I listed reasons why athletes lose their fortunes and face financial stress and bankruptcy based on past research, including: 1) spending like a drunken sailor as if the checks will never stop; 2) creating unsustainable lifestyles; 3) buying houses the size of Texas; 4) diamonds and automobiles seem to be the favorite consumables; 5) risky and sometimes even inane ‘investments,’ such as inflatable furniture rafts, sonic rays, music labels, nightclubs, T-shirt companies, cosmetic procedures and Ponzi schemes; 6) a chronic misallocation of investment dollars into nonliquid assets and private equity deals; 7) misplaced trust and agent mismanagement; 8) granting powers of attorney; 9) divorce and paternity actions; and 10) supporting enablers.”[25] Portis is a story of youth, enormous wealth, and misplaced trust. attempted to repay the remainder with six checks that were all refused by the bank because Portis had insufficient funds.”[30] The casino has filed an adversary proceeding in his bankruptcy case requesting non-dischargeability.[31] The United States Trustee has filed a Motion to Dismiss Portis’ bankruptcy “citing the fact that Portis has failed to submit financial reports and tax documents” as required, and “has not paid his mandated court fees.”[32] The dismissal was scheduled to be heard on March 3, 2016.[33] At the center of any athlete’s bankruptcy is a bad investment and a questionable financial advisor.

The money that was supposed to have supported these guys for the rest of their lives has been taken from them and many have been left with nothing.

This is truly a tragic story.[71] The alleged losses asserted in the lawsuit against BB&T include: Jevon Kearse – $7,958,000 Jamaal Anderson – $5,813,000 Lito Sheppard – $5,011,000 Santana Moss – $4,852,000 Ray Lewis – $3,778,000 Brandon Meriweather – $3,545,000 Jacob Bell – $3,339,000 Clinton Portis – $3,136,000 Gerard Warren – $3,000,000 Fred Taylor – $2,993,000 Derrick Gaffney – $2,295,000 Greg Jones – $2,006,000 Kenard Lang – $1,648,000 Frank Gore – $1,600,000 Santonio Holmes – $1,159,000 Tavares Gooden – $515,000.[72] After beginning a jury trial in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, U. District Court Judge Beth Bloom accepted a settlement agreement between the parties for an undisclosed amount and dismissed the lawsuit with prejudice.[73] BB&T’s statement said, “Both parties are pleased to resolve this matter.”[74] “We have decided to keep the terms of our settlement confidential and cannot comment further.”[75] Plaintiff’s Attorney Andrew Kagan also said, “All I am at liberty to say is that both sides are pleased with the resolution.”[76] Portis is just one of many athletes that has seen a career of riches result in financial disaster.

If on the kickoff the ball lands out of bounds into the receiving team's end zone and no one tries to run with it, play begins at the receiving team's 20 yard line.

The receiving team, called the offense, now has four tries, called downs, to advance the ball at least 10 yards down the field.

||

[19] According to the filing, Portis lists approximately $13.29 million in total assets, “but $10 million of that should have an asterisk” next to it .[20] “[Portis] lists claims against Pro Sports Financial ($8 million) — an outfit he sued in federal court over a failed casino venture – and a $2 million claim against Jade Private Wealth Management.”[21] Jade Private Wealth Management is a now out-of-business Virginia firm.[22] Jade’s former owner, Jinesh “Hodge” Brahmbhatt, had previously been banned as a financial advisor by the NFLPA after scamming several professional athletes, including Portis, out of millions of dollars by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority[23] which termed the transactions as a “Ponzi Scheme.”[24] In my editorial in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel dated October 17, 2012 entitled “Woodson, A Financial All-Star,” I listed reasons why athletes lose their fortunes and face financial stress and bankruptcy based on past research, including: 1) spending like a drunken sailor as if the checks will never stop; 2) creating unsustainable lifestyles; 3) buying houses the size of Texas; 4) diamonds and automobiles seem to be the favorite consumables; 5) risky and sometimes even inane ‘investments,’ such as inflatable furniture rafts, sonic rays, music labels, nightclubs, T-shirt companies, cosmetic procedures and Ponzi schemes; 6) a chronic misallocation of investment dollars into nonliquid assets and private equity deals; 7) misplaced trust and agent mismanagement; 8) granting powers of attorney; 9) divorce and paternity actions; and 10) supporting enablers.”[25] Portis is a story of youth, enormous wealth, and misplaced trust. attempted to repay the remainder with six checks that were all refused by the bank because Portis had insufficient funds.”[30] The casino has filed an adversary proceeding in his bankruptcy case requesting non-dischargeability.[31] The United States Trustee has filed a Motion to Dismiss Portis’ bankruptcy “citing the fact that Portis has failed to submit financial reports and tax documents” as required, and “has not paid his mandated court fees.”[32] The dismissal was scheduled to be heard on March 3, 2016.[33] At the center of any athlete’s bankruptcy is a bad investment and a questionable financial advisor.The money that was supposed to have supported these guys for the rest of their lives has been taken from them and many have been left with nothing.This is truly a tragic story.[71] The alleged losses asserted in the lawsuit against BB&T include: Jevon Kearse – $7,958,000 Jamaal Anderson – $5,813,000 Lito Sheppard – $5,011,000 Santana Moss – $4,852,000 Ray Lewis – $3,778,000 Brandon Meriweather – $3,545,000 Jacob Bell – $3,339,000 Clinton Portis – $3,136,000 Gerard Warren – $3,000,000 Fred Taylor – $2,993,000 Derrick Gaffney – $2,295,000 Greg Jones – $2,006,000 Kenard Lang – $1,648,000 Frank Gore – $1,600,000 Santonio Holmes – $1,159,000 Tavares Gooden – $515,000.[72] After beginning a jury trial in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, U. District Court Judge Beth Bloom accepted a settlement agreement between the parties for an undisclosed amount and dismissed the lawsuit with prejudice.[73] BB&T’s statement said, “Both parties are pleased to resolve this matter.”[74] “We have decided to keep the terms of our settlement confidential and cannot comment further.”[75] Plaintiff’s Attorney Andrew Kagan also said, “All I am at liberty to say is that both sides are pleased with the resolution.”[76] Portis is just one of many athletes that has seen a career of riches result in financial disaster.If on the kickoff the ball lands out of bounds into the receiving team's end zone and no one tries to run with it, play begins at the receiving team's 20 yard line.The receiving team, called the offense, now has four tries, called downs, to advance the ball at least 10 yards down the field.

,159,000 Tavares Gooden – 5,000.[72] After beginning a jury trial in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, U. District Court Judge Beth Bloom accepted a settlement agreement between the parties for an undisclosed amount and dismissed the lawsuit with prejudice.[73] BB&T’s statement said, “Both parties are pleased to resolve this matter.”[74] “We have decided to keep the terms of our settlement confidential and cannot comment further.”[75] Plaintiff’s Attorney Andrew Kagan also said, “All I am at liberty to say is that both sides are pleased with the resolution.”[76] Portis is just one of many athletes that has seen a career of riches result in financial disaster.

If on the kickoff the ball lands out of bounds into the receiving team's end zone and no one tries to run with it, play begins at the receiving team's 20 yard line.

The receiving team, called the offense, now has four tries, called downs, to advance the ball at least 10 yards down the field.

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In my post, With a limited useful life, athletes need to conserve and be conservative in their financial endeavors.

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